People & Science

A publication of the British Science Association

19/09/2014

Show me content for... +

Show me content for...
Events
Resources
Volunteers
Teachers
Professional development
Families & teenagers (aged 12+)
Families (children aged 12 & under)

Donate

register

Register with us and you can....

  • Sign up to our free e-communications
  • Become a member of the Association
  • Create your own web account, & post comments
  • Be part of British Science Festival
  • Save your favourite items

Register

Keep up to date with the latest news from the British Science Assocation. Sign up to our RSS feeds and take us with you when you are on the move.

You are here

British Science Association news

Height of fashion

Coralie Young celebrates a range of events

X-change: X-citing, X-plosive, X-perimental!

The British Science Festival celebrated many hugely successful events this year, with great feedback all round. Many of the events were completely packed out, as Aberdeen came alive with shows, talks, debates, demonstrations, comedy, workshops, and more…

One of the biggest highlights was the geeky music, science demos and cutting edge research at the x-change, the free festival highlight show, which ran for five days of the Festival. 

Many famous faces featured on the show, including Nobel prize-winning biologist Sir Paul Nurse, and Professors Brian Cox and Jeffrey Forshaw, whose sessions were completely sold out.

Tim Drysdale spoke about public opinion on the use of whole-body scanners, and the moral dilemma raised by using x-rays to see people’s bodies in this way.

Sarah Castor-Perry taught the audience how to make their own cheese, and Noel Jackson was challenged ‘Ready, Steady, Cook!’ style to make a cocktail, and to throw in some science.

Listen to the x-change podcast and read the blog to find out more about the Best of the Fest.

Height of fashion

Coralie Young celebrates a range of events

X-change: X-citing, X-plosive, X-perimental!

The British Science Festival celebrated many hugely successful events this year, with great feedback all round. Many of the events were completely packed out, as Aberdeen came alive with shows, talks, debates, demonstrations, comedy, workshops, and more…

One of the biggest highlights was the geeky music, science demos and cutting edge research at the x-change, the free festival highlight show, which ran for five days of the Festival. 

Many famous faces featured on the show, including Nobel prize-winning biologist Sir Paul Nurse, and Professors Brian Cox and Jeffrey Forshaw, whose sessions were completely sold out.

Tim Drysdale spoke about public opinion on the use of whole-body scanners, and the moral dilemma raised by using x-rays to see people’s bodies in this way.

Sarah Castor-Perry taught the audience how to make their own cheese, and Noel Jackson was challenged ‘Ready, Steady, Cook!’ style to make a cocktail, and to throw in some science.

Listen to the x-change podcast and read the blog to find out more about the Best of the Fest.

Fashion and textiles in the limelight

The National Science + Engineering Competition is delighted to be working in association with the UK Fashion and Textile Association (UKFT), to create the first-ever NSEC award specifically for fashion and textile projects.

UKFT’s Textile Edge Award has been created to recognise the number of excellent NSEC projects which use fashion and textiles technology, and will be awarded at the NSEC finals at the Big Bang Fair in March 2013.

Strictly Engineering

Thirty engineers shared and discussed their area of expertise with the public at the British Science Festival, with an exciting, eye-catching poster they developed with the support of graphic designers and public engagement specialists.

The aims of Strictly Engineering were to spark conversation about the implications of engineering in our everyday lives, challenge stereotypes around engineering, and to draw attention to the world-class engineering going on in the UK.

Visit the Strictly Engineering page on the Science in Society section of our new-look website to view all the posters. Smartphone users can even scan the QR codes for more information.

Young Scientists celebrate success in Europe

The British Science Association is celebrating the success of two British delegates to the European Union Contest for Young Scientists (EUCYS). Coordinated by the Association’s Young People’s Programme, two of the young participants representing Great Britain came away with prizes.

Thomas Glenn Myers and Helen Mary Sheehan were two of just seven participants awarded special donated prizes. They were invited to attend EUCYS after impressing judges at the National Science + Engineering Competition, run by the Association.

Thomas, 18, was selected for a week-long visit to the European Southern Observatory (ESO) after impressing judges with his project on Gravitational Lensing. Helen, also 18, will be spending a week at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, as recognition for her exceptional project on Processing and Characterisation Nanosteel by Selective Laser Melting.

The EUCYS is an initiative created by the European Commission in 1989 with a goal of promoting the exchange of ideas between young scientists between young scientists and guiding them to a future in science and technology. The event is held annually, and invites the best young minds from different countries to share their work and compare ideas.

The National Science + Engineering Competition  2013-14 is now open for entries. Young people aged 11-18 are invited to showcase their science and engineering projects to judges at the regional heats in June/July 2013, held at The Big Bang Regional Fairs.

Click for More
Coralie Young
Coralie Young is the British Science Association’s Communications Manager
Join the debate...
Log in or register to post comments