Science in Society

Sharing good practice & encouraging innovation in public engagement

01/08/2014

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Strictly Engineering - the winner!

The SiS Team hosted the Strictly Engineering poster competition at the British Science Festival from the 4th to the 9th of September 2012. Strictly Engineering is aimed at researchers from all walks of engineering life, both in academia and in industry.

Strictly Engineering is a project that sets out to remove the stereotype of engineers by bringing engineers face to face with public groups to explain how their research is relevant to our lives.

The engineers received training and mentoring about engineering’s impact on society, communication and design by professional graphic designers and science communicators and they produced the posters within this catalogue. To access bonus online content from the engineers, scan the QR codes on the posters!

At the Festival, the posters were visited by a wide range of Festival-goers and the engineers had to impress both the visiting public and a distinguished panel of judges with their use of graphic design and spoken communication.

The winner and runners up of Strictly Engineering were announced during the final x-change show at the British Science Festival. The winner was Isobel Houghton from the University of Bristol for her poster “Can you send a secret?”, and the two runners up were Rosanna Kleemann and Natasha Watson.

If you’d like to download a high-resolution PDF of any of the posters from this project, please contact sis@britishscienceassociation.org

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