CREST Awards

Science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) enrichment activities to inspire and engage young people aged 5-19 years

20/12/2014

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Resources and support available

You can find resources and support for setting up a Club at the STEM Clubs website www.stemclubs.net/

Rewarding and engaging for teachers and mentors

Adults involved in STEM clubs can benefit just as much as the students (Photos courtesy of The Big Bang)

Students can be proud of their achievements at any level

From the first time they undertake a project to competing in national competitions, clubs can cater for all. (Photos courtesy of The Big Bang)

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Clubs support

If you are running a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) club, are thinking about starting one up or just getting involved to help, these pages contain information for those interested.

On this page you can find out about:

  • Why support Clubs?
  • What are the benefits?
  • Ways to support Clubs
  • Who to contact if you want to support clubs

On additional pages in this section, you can find more detailed guidance about:

Who to contact if you want to support clubs

Below is some basic information on who to contact if you would like to support clubs. It is in no way exhaustive, but gives you a good indication of where to start.

STEM Clubs Network

The STEM Club Network is managed by STEMNET. There are a number of ways you can contact STEMNET about STEM Clubs:

To work with clubs in your region contact your local STEMNET contract holder.

To volunteer, consider becoming a STEM Ambassador. You will receive training and a CRB check, as well as being notified of different STEM volunteering opportunities. Details are here, and your STEMNET Contract holder will also be able to help you with this.

Do you have an activity you think would be suitable for STEM clubs? If your activity is local then contact your local STEMNET contract holder and for national projects contact support@stemclubs.net.  Also consider using the National STEM Centre elibrary or the STEM Directories to share details of your activity.

Below is some basic information on who to contact if you would like to support clubs. It is in no way exhaustive, but gives you a good indication of where to start.

STEM Clubs Network

The STEM Club Network is managed by STEMNET. There are a number of ways you can contact STEMNET about STEM Clubs:

To work with clubs in your region contact your local STEMNET contract holder.

To volunteer, consider becoming a STEM Ambassador. You will receive training and a CRB check, as well as being notified of different STEM volunteering opportunities. Details are here, and your STEMNET Contract holder will also be able to help you with this.

Do you have an activity you think would be suitable for STEM clubs? If your activity is local then contact your local STEMNET contract holder and for national projects contact support@stemclubs.net.  Also consider using the National STEM Centre elibrary or the STEM Directories to share details of your activity.

Ways to support Clubs

Businesses, organizations and individuals can support STEM Clubs in many ways, here are some examples:

  • Hands on activities
  • Kit
  • Competitions
  • Funding
  • Resources
  • Student events
  • Teacher events
  • Volunteering
  • Arranging visits to the workplace

Businesses, organizations and individuals can support STEM Clubs in many ways, here are some examples:

  • Hands on activities
  • Kit
  • Competitions
  • Funding
  • Resources
  • Student events
  • Teacher events
  • Volunteering
  • Arranging visits to the workplace
Why support Clubs? What are the benefits?

Good for Students
STEM Clubs are a place where traditionally academic subjects become hands-on and fun. Whether the club is focussed on long term projects or one off whizz-bang activities, the effect is to increase student’s enthusiasm for the STEM subjects and enrich the learning experience.

Good for Teacher
For teachers STEM clubs are a place where they can go off curriculum, or try out new activities that can later be incorporated into the curriculum. Many teachers report that the fun and enthusiasm found in STEM clubs is what they went in to teaching for in the first place.

Good for Students
STEM Clubs are a place where traditionally academic subjects become hands-on and fun. Whether the club is focussed on long term projects or one off whizz-bang activities, the effect is to increase student’s enthusiasm for the STEM subjects and enrich the learning experience.

Good for Teacher
For teachers STEM clubs are a place where they can go off curriculum, or try out new activities that can later be incorporated into the curriculum. Many teachers report that the fun and enthusiasm found in STEM clubs is what they went in to teaching for in the first place.

Good for Schools
Some schools use the excitement generated by a STEM club as a way of increasing the uptake of STEM subjects at GSCE and beyond. STEM Clubs are also a good environment for students to do project work needed for prestigious competitions such as the National Science and Engineering Competition.

Good for Society
Businesses in the UK have identified skills shortages in the STEM subjects. The increased enthusiasm that STEM clubs bring will encourage more students to take up STEM subjects at GSCE and beyond. And, STEM clubs are a place where traditional stereotypes can be broken down so encouraging more girls and ethnic minorities into STEM careers.